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Looe

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Arrive at Looe, you will love this pretty magical Cornish fishing town with quaint historical buildings, twisting streets, smugglers haunts and Cornwall's finest markets. The attractive twin rivers of East and West Looe converge and pass under a fine many arched stone bridge that links the two towns.

Looe's heritage is closely entwined with the sea and the men who fish there. In trade for Cornish fish, the Looe fishermen gained in wool, corn, slate, French salt and wine, and wood and iron from the Spanish. With the discovery of Newfoundland in 1497, the word fast spread to Looe fishermen who began seasonal journeys across the Atlantic to develop the rich cod grounds.

The jouneys to the Canadian coast also brought their perils, many Looe fishermen left port never to come back. In the early days a sudden storm cost many a life on cramped vessels weighing little more than 60 tons. After setting out in early Spring, a good number of the boats would return via the Mediterranean, dealing the salted cod for a host of merchandise from Portugal, Spain and Italy - the Looe fishermen bringing home boats laden with fruit, wood and wine. Nowadays Looe is a enlivened working port, its fishermen still bring home the harvest of the sea and tourists are welcome to watch the boats coming in and out, and maybe sample some of the catch at local markets.

Should you be looking for an historical seaside vacation - sun, sand and sea. You don't have to look any further than Looe with its delightful sandy beach and shallow seas. Plus an abundance of rock pools for the kids to explore.

Looe's safe bay and river mouth are a well known with sailing, motorboat and water sports participants whilst the activities of the fishing fleet are a endless fascination to all, whether it is landing the day's catch or the eagerness of weighing in the game fish at the National Shark Angling Club of Great Britain headquarters.

Only a short hop from the seashore is St George's Island, once a commonly used landing place for smugglers. Tourists today can enjoy its unspoilt beauty.
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